InternetSAR.org: Volunteers collaboratively analyzing aerial and satellite imagery to assist in search and rescue efforts.

InternetSAR.org

Volunteers collaboratively analyzing aerial and satellite imagery to assist in search and rescue efforts.

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Media Release: InternetSAR.org Joins Search Effort for Missing plane in Guyana

On November 1, 2008 at 2:14 local time (1814 Zulu) a King Air with three people onboard took off from the Cheddi Jagan International airport in Georgetown, Guyana on a geological survey flight. Forty five minutes latter a radio transmission was relayed to ATC indicating that the airplane and its crew were in their working area, nothing has been heard from them since. The Guyanan Defense Force and the companies who had operated the survey aircraft launch a massive search involving multiple aircraft, helicopters and ground forces. On November 14 after many days of searching in the area the Guyana Defense Force ceased their search mission for the missing airplane. The private firms continued their aerial search through early December employing a variety of sensors. They also have conducted limited ground searching which continues to today.

InternetSAR.org has volunteered to help with the search for the three men and their missing airplane, by reviewing the over 750 sq kilometers of high resolution aerial photographs of the search area collected during the search effort. InternetSAR.org carries out its search missions by using volunteers who log on over the internet and download an aerial photograph from the search area. The volunteer then scans the image looking for signs of the missing airplane. In previous search missions InternetSAR.org has had over 2,000 people scanning aerial imagery looking for missing airplanes.

InternetSAR.org's founder Ken Barbalace has reviewed the imagery and says "That this is about best imagery we have seen" he also notes that it is also the most challenging environment with "trees that over 150 feet tall and dense jungle", however he remains optimistic that the missing aircraft can be found. During the search mission volunteers will scanning over 8,000 aerial images that take up 300 gigabytes of computer storage.

If people are interested in helping search for the three men and their missing airplane they can signup at http://InternetSAR.org.

For more information on the InternetSAR.org search mission please contact Greg Ursel, InternetSAR.org, SAR Liaison at gursel@internetsar.org